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Tuesday, April 28, 2020 | History

2 edition of Gender, the evolution of legal institutions and economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa found in the catalog.

Gender, the evolution of legal institutions and economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa

Doris M. Martin

Gender, the evolution of legal institutions and economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Poverty and Social Policy Division, Technical Dept., Africa Region, World Bank in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Women -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- Africa, Sub-Saharan -- History.,
  • Women"s rights -- Africa, Sub-Saharan -- History.,
  • Women in economic development -- Africa, Sub-Saharan.,
  • Women -- Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Social conditions.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDoris M. Martin, Fatuma Omar Hashi.
    SeriesWorking paper -- no. 3, Working paper (World Bank. Africa Region. Technical Dept. Poverty and Social Policy Division) -- no. 3.
    ContributionsHashi, Fatuma Omar., World Bank. Africa Regional Office. Technical Dept. Poverty and Social Policy Division.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKQC145.W64 M37 1992
    The Physical Object
    Pagination50 p. ;
    Number of Pages50
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22800716M
    LC Control Number2008612821

    Women, Gender, and Development in Africa. legal, and economic systems and processes. Patriarchy is built on the assumed livelihoods in sub-Saharan African since the : Nana Akua Anyidoho. Comment: This is an ex-library book and may have the usual library/used-book markings book has soft covers. In good all round condition.. Please note the Image in this listing is a stock photo and may not match the covers of the actual itemCited by: Perspectives on Gender-Based Violence and Women’s Economic Empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa: Challenges and Opportunities from organizations implementing and/or conducting research on economic empowerment interventions targeted to women in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings from the literature review guided the questions for the KIIs.


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Gender, the evolution of legal institutions and economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa by Doris M. Martin Download PDF EPUB FB2

The sub-Saharan Africa Regional Report draws on SIGI’s 14 variables that measure gender-based discrimination in social norms, practices and laws. The Regional Report reveals both the heterogeneity between countries and issues that affect women across the region such as violence against women.

As is the case in many developing countries — as well as in advanced economies such as the United States — women in sub-Saharan Africa still often lack access to the same chances for economic success as their male counterparts. While there has been some progress on the third Millennium Development Goal to “promote gender equality and empower women,” as indicated in the Millennium.

Klasen, S. and F. Lamanna () ‘The Impact of Gender Inequality in Education and Employment on Economic Growth in the Middle East and North Africa’, background paper for Gender and Development in the Middle East and North Africa, World Bank, Washington, by: Gender inequality in sub-Saharan Africa remains a significant problem.

Gender inequality in access to education and adequate health care and in paid employment remain pervasive in sub-Saharan Africa, though the region has seen improvement in recent years. Figure 2 shows the evolution of gender inequality over the last two decades in the region.

Based on this perspective, we would expect gender gaps to be much larger in sub-Saharan African nations than those found in research on Western nations because sub-Saharan African nations lag behind in their economic and political development and associated cultural attitudes (e.g., rational and self-expression values) (Inglehart and Norris Cited by: Gender disparities in secondary education have barely changed in sub-Saharan Africa sincewith still only around 8 girls for every 10 boys enrolling.

Inat least 19 countries around the world had fewer than 90 girls for every boys in school, 15 of which the evolution of legal institutions and economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa book in sub-Saharan Africa.

The advent of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Agenda represent a unique opportunity for sub-Saharan Africa to accelerate progress on gender equality.

Sub-Saharan Africa has signed up to two ambitious socially transformative agendas which boast great promise for gender equality. Successful achievement of these agendas will stronglyFile Size: 5MB. ownership overlaps with other land rights in six countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The study reveals significant gender gaps not only in land ownership but also in land management and the rights Gender sell or use the land as collateral.

The sizes of the gender gaps in land rights vary across countries with Niger and Nigeria exhibiting larger gender. Sub-Saharan Africa. With an average remaining gender gap of 32%, the Sub-Saharan Africa region scores in the lower middle range of the Global Gender Gap Index, ahead of South Asia and behind Eastern Europe and Central Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean.

Gender and Property Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa: a Review of Constraints and Effective Interventions* Michael O’Sullivan† JEL Codes: P48,D14, K11 Keywords: property rights, gender, land, savings, assets *This document is part of a series of technical review papers for the World Bank’s Africa Gender Innovation views.

Economic & Social Affairs DESA Working Paper No. ST/ESA//DWP/ February Globalization and development in sub-Saharan Africa Jomo Kwame Sundaram with Oliver Schwank and Rudiger von Arnim. Gender and enterprise development in Sub-Saharan Africa: a review of constraints and effective interventions (English) Abstract.

Female participation in entrepreneurial activities is higher in Sub-Saharan Africa than in any other region. However, women-owned businesses significantly underperform those owned by by: 1.

of women’s contribution to growth and economic development in post-colonial Africa. The paper investigates the paradox of increased female enrollment in education and the persistence of gender discrimination in labor force participation; it also considers the overwhelming importance of the informal economy in female economic Size: KB.

Gender,Time Use,and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africasheds light on a critical dimension ofpoverty in Sub-Saharan Africa: time gh the concept oftime poverty has been used in the development literature,it is not always clear what is meant by time poverty,how it can be measured,what impact it has on other areas,and what actions are.

Discusses the role of women in economic and political development in Sub-Saharan Africa. Influence of women in social, economic and political affairs; Issues on overcoming gender stereotypes and institutional discrimination; Role of the international community in addressing the issues.

This thesis is based on a Legal Origins – Legal Institutions – Poverty structure. This means that in Part I, I will study the legal origins of Sub-Saharan Africa. In Part II, I will analyse the importance of legal institutions in influencing economic and human development.

This part will be the most theoretical one. It is 40 years since Ester Boserup published her book. Woman's role in economic development (Boserup, ). The book marked an important step in understanding the position of women in developing economies and the way in which their position was being impacted by – what was referred to at the time as – world Size: KB.

Researchers have linked sub-Saharan Africa’s (SSA) poor growth performance in recent decades to several factors, including geography, institutions, and low returns to investment.

This literature has not yet integrated the research that identifies linkages between gender, economic development, and growth, however. This paper explores the macro effects of gender, transmitted via the productive. Women’s Opportunities and Challenges in Sub-Saharan African Job Markets Prepared by Christine Dieterich, Anni Huang, Alun Thomas As labor market data is scarce in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), this paper uses household survey data to various levels of development in this region, to study gender inequality in labor Size: KB.

This paper reviews gender budgeting in sub-Saharan Africa and discusses examples of prominent gender budgeting efforts in the region, while noting salient features of other efforts.

The Social Institutions and Gender Index (SIGI) measures gender-based discrimination in social norms, practices and laws across countries. The SIGI comprises country profiles, a classification of countries and a database; it serves as a research, policy and advocacy. Acknowledge that each country in sub-Saharan Africa has a unique journey towards gender empowerment and rural development.

Focus on women empowerment and equal rights, taking local gender dynamics into account. Invest in rural areas, ensuring balanced division between farm and non-farm income. This Presidential Address considers the effects of gender inequality on human development in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Parameter estimates from quantile and ordinal categorical latent variable specifications of the relationship between components of the Human Development Index and measures of gender inequality suggests that human development in Sub-Saharan Africa increases Cited by: 1. WOMEN AND DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA: FROM MARGINALIZATION TO GENDER INEQUALITY Fredoline O.

Anunobi, Prairie View A&M University ABSTRACT This article examines the role ofwomen in economic andpolitical development, attempts made by women to overcome their socio-economicand political underdevelopment and marginalization, and the role of the intemational.

The spread of information and communication technologies (ICT) in Sub-Sharan Africa has provided a new arena for gender-based violence (GBV). Unfortunately, the growth of ICT has out-paced legal developments to regulate by: 4. Increasing the levels of participation in secondary education are explicit goals of the Dakar Framework for Action, as well as MDG 3 on gender parity and equality.

Unfortunately, progress in secondary education in Sub-Saharan Africa isn’t growing as quickly as Primary Education in Sub-Saharan Women and African Economic Development. UNESCO. The Status of Human Rights Organizations in Sub-Saharan Africa legal proceedings can tie down the domestic human rights and legal community in costly and time-consuming preparations to defend cases which never materialize.

A more positive development on the legal front in some African countries has been the recent adoption of enforceable. BSR | Women’s Economic Empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa: Recommendations for Business Action 6 Executive Summary Women’s economic empowerment is widely recognized by governments, international development institutions, and businesses globally as essential for human progress, thriving economies, and business Size: 2MB.

Gender roles are not only hindering the potential of women in Africa, but they are also hindering Africa’s potential. About 90 percent of the Sub-Saharan Africa’s food is tended to by women who have little say in the economy that affects their work.

While women in Africa do the lion’s share of work, they are not valued the same as men. The Gender Data Portal is the World Bank Group’s comprehensive source for the latest sex-disaggregated data and gender statistics covering demography, education, health, access to economic opportunities, public life and decision-making, and agency.

Abstract. A growing body of empirical evidence suggests that inequality-income or gender related-canimpede economic growth.

Using dynamic panel regressions and new time series data, this paperfinds that both income and gender inequalities, including from legal gender-based restrictions, arejointly negatively associated with per capita GDP by: 9.

In light of the opportunities and the challenges facing African economies in the 21st century, the volume traces the evolution of poverty in the course of economic development in sub-Saharan Africa.

By engaging with, and seeking to develop on, the work of Professor Erik Thorbecke, it examines the evolving dynamics of poverty in multiple dimensions.

inequality within countries in sub-Saharan Africa by African research institutions. This includes research conducted by both national and regional institutions and by international agencies in the African region.

The review is to be used as a basis for an inter-regional synthesis of work onFile Size: KB. Economic opportunities for the empowerment of women in Africa and the LDCs: Access to credit, land, and markets, United Nations Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries,File Size: 1MB.

The study suggests that gender inequality acts as a significant constraint to growth in sub-Saharan Africa, and that removing gender-based barriers to growth will make a substantial contribution to realizing Africa’s economic potential. In particular we highlight gender gaps in education, related high fertility levels, gender gaps in formal sector employment, and gender gaps in access to.

This book offers an introduction to the analysis of gender in the econo-mies of sub-Saharan Africa. Gender refers to the constellation of rules and identities that prescribe and proscribe behavior for persons, in their social roles as men and women.

These rules and identities may be deliber. The four papers in this journal supplement explore the issue of gender inequality and look at theoretical and empirical relationship between gender and economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa. The first paper by Seguino and Were is on Gender, Development and Economic Growth in Cited by: 3.

in modern-day Sub-Saharan Africa between the sexes. By the mids, FGM (a common cultural practice still engaged in today by women in Sub-Saharan Africa) had been significant factor in the gender divide in Sub-Saharan Africa for over 20 years (Stearns ).

FGM is a practice that is done to adolescent girls in order to decreaseCited by: 1. the sub-Saharan Africa region. The effects of global economic integration, corruption, geography and ethnic diversity have been widely explored.

Mainstream growth analyses, however, have not yet integrated the body of scholarship thatidentifies the linkages between gender, economic develop-ment File Size: KB.

Weapons are also transported into Kenya and used for a variety of unlawful and dangerous means (RSO, personal statement, ).

These weapons play a significant role in transnational crime as well as common street disorder in major cities. Since guns are not manufactured in Kenya, it is only logical to believe that the weapons enter the country in ways that are a danger to. governance quality in sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing insights from the new institutional economics, I emphasise institutions' role in influencing the alignment between governments' immediate political incentives and the requirements of longer-term economic development.

I analyse the sen. Empowering Women: Legal Rights and Economic Opportunities in Africa. Africa development forum series. Washington DC: Agence Française de Développement and the World Bank This World Bank publication is the first study to look systematically across Sub-Saharan Africa to examine the impacts of property rights on women’s economic empowerment.

The Africa where there is mistreatment of women is the same Africa rife with economic warfare. Though this picture contrasts the beauty and elegance praised by the poets of the Negritude, the abjection of African women must be highlighted in this situation of crisis.